Originally posted 2016-06-25 12:00:32. This week, I unintentionally, read two books concerning demonic children. Figuratively, in We Need to Talk About Kevin, and literally in Rosemary’s Baby. When I am exceptionally irritable, I find it useful to read about individuals in situations that are far worse than those of which I myself will likely encounter…

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Originally posted 2016-06-21 17:00:22. Neglect. Hallucinations. Paranoia. Theodor Geisel expertly weaves together these elements in his 1957 psychological thriller, The Cat In The Hat. Told by an unnamed narrator of questionable reliability, readers are encouraged to subscribe to his hallucinations of domesticated creatures that run amok during the appalling absence of parental authority. Geisel’s story centers…

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Originally posted 2016-06-18 12:00:09. The Middlesteins speaks to anyone that has ever dealt with an unhealthy obsession with food, family drama, and heartbreak. I’m pretty sure that those qualifications cover most of the female population. Jami Attenberg’s simultaneously poignant yet humorous depiction of the Middlestein family results in a stunning novel that is undoubtedly one…

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Originally posted 2016-06-14 17:00:31. Some authors are fantastic at novels, but their short stories are less than satisfactory. For some authors, it’s the other way around. And then, there are the select few that really have a grasp on both realms. With Astray, Emma Donoghue proves herself to be a member of this elite group….

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Originally posted 2016-06-11 12:00:38. Embarrassing confession time: the title of this book, The Mystery of the Lost Cézanne, led me to the assumption that this would be a story about a missing lady named Cézanne. Yes, I took Art History in college. Yes, I am reasonably educated. Alas, it took me about 30 pages to get beyond my…

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Originally posted 2016-06-07 17:00:45. Charlotte Cates, trendily known as “Charlie,” has endured the death of her child, and since that time has also experienced bizarre dreams about children in trouble. One of these dreams prompts her to accept a job researching a Louisiana family in order to write a book about the mystery that has…

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Originally posted 2016-06-04 12:00:10. If You Could See What I See is one of the better books that I have found through good old Kindle Unlimited, but really, that only means that it isn’t downright unreadable. The story was solid, the characters were interesting. But, at the end of the day, it’s still only meh….

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Originally posted 2016-06-02 17:00:33. Title: It Author: Stephen King Published: 1986 Pages: 1,138 Genre:  Science Fiction/Horror/Thriller Kid Friendly Rating:  0/10 Synopsis: So let’s start at the beginning. Like most people I first saw it on TV during the 90’s and starring Tim Curry as Pennywise the dancing clown. To be honest, every time I watched It, I thought it was…

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Originally posted 2016-05-31 17:00:08. I read this novel in grade school, so for years I put off revisiting it as an adult. I loved it when I read it as a seventh grader, but sometimes rereading novels later in life can result in a thoroughly different experience. I did have a different experience; mainly because…

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Originally posted 2016-05-28 12:00:21. Charlie is a sixteen-year-old young man whose narration suggests a mild retardation or some sort of unresolved trauma to the brain. In any case, Charlie’s woebegotten melodrama is told through a series of letters that he is writing to an apparently random individual (although Charlie consistently maintains that this person is not…

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Originally posted 2016-05-24 17:00:16. When a team exploring frozen dead things in the Arctic stumbles across the fully-preserved body of a man, they embark on a scientific journey fraught with moral ambiguity, intrigue, and love. Having had varied levels of success reanimating dead bugs and such, the team figures that they might as well give it a…

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Originally posted 2016-05-21 12:00:52. Amazon reviewers rave over E.L. Doctorow, so I sincerely hope that Andrew’s Brain is not representative of this man’s body of work. If asked to use one word to describe this novel, that word would be “pointless.” I have no idea what I was supposed to take away from this novel, other than…

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Originally posted 2016-05-10 17:00:46. Sussanna Daniel’s Sea Creatures is one of the most simultaneously hideous and boring novels that I have ever had the misfortune of reading. With no likable characters and a relentlessly tedious plot, I am baffled by the critical acclaim that this book has consistently garnered. I am here to tell you that…

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Originally posted 2016-04-30 12:00:01. 50 Shades of Grey opens with the virginal young Anastasia Steele – a reserved college senior majoring in British literature. James does not hesitate to emphasize the obvious comparisons to the loss of purity in Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles – and re-emphasize them, and then emphasize them again for emphasis….

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